Archive for Personal

Generally, a sad day

Posted in Personal with tags , , , on March 5, 2009 by Mike

Today we put my old Cattle Dog, Sara, to sleep. She was almost 15 and had been sick for a while.

Sara at 9 years old

Sara at 9 years old

I got Sara as a gift from a friend when I started looking for a house to buy. She was the first dog I ever had and quickly became my buddy. When I worked from home (which was most of the time for years), she slept on the office floor, between me and the door, in case I left the room.

Cattle Dogs are called Velcro dogs because they bond to one person and then follow that person everywhere. I was her person.

My son taught her to swim the summer we got her. Matthew spent a month making sure she could get in and out of the pool safely. He created a monster.

She usually started swimming by April every year. When she was younger, by mid-July, her red coat was green. She would let you spend hours throwing the ball in the pool so she could get it. Hours. She never tired of the game.

Sara was a party dog; she liked playing with children in the pool on long summer days. She would swim for 8 or 10 hours straight, only stopping when the children stopped. And then collapsing under my chair.

When she was 5, she blew one of her knees out. The options were put her down or repair the knee. We chose repairing the knee, knowing that she would be arthritic when she got old. Six months later, she blew the other one out. We had that one repaired, too. It only slowed her down a little.

When we got the orange cat, Marley, she adopted him as her best friend. She taught him how to be a good dog and was always mad when he got on the roof. Dogs don’t belong on the roof, she seemed to say, pacing and barking at him.

Being a good herding dog, she also herded children. Toddlers were great herding targets. I found her guarding a group of small children, all neatly herded up in a corner of my living room more than once. She looked very proud of herself but the children were crying.

She had a wicked dog sense of humor. I called her Laughing Dog for a reason – she would get the giggles and fall over.

In the last few years, her swimming almost completely stopped because it was too hard for her to step into the pool. Her entire back end was just not working that well. When we got the Aussie 18 months ago, she paced the side of the pool, huffing and barking, looking for the world like she was coaching as we taught him to swim.

She was diagnosed with a slow growing cancer about 4 years ago. The vet said her 5 year prognosis was not good but since her breed usually lives 12 years… We decided to do nothing and just watch. The place it would show up next was her stomach, he said. And it did.

All her life, Sara slept next to my side of the bed, in case I got up during the night. That spot will be empty now, unless the Aussie takes it.

Not the best day in my house. But I wouldn’t have missed having her for the world.

Releases everywhere

Posted in DITA, MadCap, MadCap software, Personal, Tech Comm, technical writer, technical writing, webinars with tags , , , , , on February 25, 2009 by Mike

By now you’ve heard MadCap Software released the new versions of Lingo, Mimic, and Capture. Good products, great updates. Our guys worked hard to do great products.

Big picture stuff

I’m not going to tell you all the new stuff here; you can click the links and go to our website and see what’s new. But here’s a fast overview of the stuff I think is cool:

  • Lingo: Imports Word, DITA, RTF, and more source files. So if you’re writing in these formats, you can use Lingo to translate your files.
  • Mimic: MovieSync is a huge deal in Mimic. Here’s how that works.

Let’s say you have a screen movie of a tutorial for creating reports in your product. You have call outs, mouse movements, all that stuff. And then they changed the application – perhaps a new version. With MovieSync, you start the application, open Mimic, and re-record the movie. Open both the old version and the new version in MovieSync. Now you can specify to move some callouts, all the callouts, what frames get what, and so on.

Think of the time you can save by not having to manually re-do each thing you did on each screen. Wow.

  • Capture: Conditions from the Flare or Blaze project are now available in your Capture files. Variable have been available for a while, but now you can conditionalize stuff in your Capture files with the same conditions from your Flare or Blaze projects.

We did a lot more in these products, this list is just the 1 thing I think is a big deal for each product.

No, seriously, they’re tools-neutral

It took 5 webinars but the word is getting out: the MadCap Webinar Series is in fact tools-neutral. Unless we state the webinar is specifically about our products, the webinar may not even mention our products.

So, if you thought you’d like some Technical Communication related training but thought we were doing some clever bait and switch, we’re not. Go sign up at http://www.madcapsoftware.com/demos/webinars.aspx for the ones coming up or to see the ones you’ve missed.

The next one is Neil Perlin talking about Using your HAT as a Content Management System, March 12 at 9am Pacific.

We’re getting 150 to 300 people signed up for these, so go see what you’ve missed!

Personally

Yesterday was my grand daughter’s 4th birthday. She had a tummy thing and spent the day throwing up, so no cupcakes for her. She managed to open the knit sweater and the crochet hat her Nana made and sent.

To see a picture of her looking a little green around the gills but wearing the stuff Nana made, go to here.

Happy Birthday, Tally! May you have a century more, my baby.

I’m cold and tired of rain

Posted in Flare, MadCap, MadCap Blaze, Madcap flare, MadCap software, Personal, Tech Comm, technical writer, technical writing, webinars with tags , , , , , , , , , on February 12, 2009 by Mike

Remember that wonderful warm weather I talked about a few weeks ago? I barely do. It’s been cold and wet for the last 10 days.

OK, So Cal cold but my bones are still cold and I’m tired of wet. I know we need the rain, but I’m still tired of it.

And we have about another week of cold and wet to go, at least.

Free webinars!

The free tech Comm webinars are going well. We did the one about making the Business Case for Moving to Topic-based Authoring today. It went very well and the response has been very good.

We’re consistently getting 150 to 250 people signed up per webinar and I’m so happy. That tells me there is a need for these and people are really interested. I like that. It’s my project and I’m just really delighted with how it’s going.

One person wrote to me today:

…I was delighted at all the extra tips you gave to help persuade Management if one were presenting a use case. I’m just delighted at the spreadsheet and information that you shared with us all…

All good stuff. To find out more about these webinars, sign up, or view the recorded ones, click here.

In the future

We’re going to run a series of 3-5 webinars on CSS. The first few will be product independent, in that they will be about CSS, regardless of the tools you re using. The last one will be an Advanced CSS in Flare or Blaze but you should be able to do this stuff in any CSS-based tool.

We’re thinking of these as a 3-5 hour crash course in CSS. Even if you don’t use our products, I think even the last one or two will be valuable to you because you should be able to hack your current tool in the ways we show you in Flare.

Watch our site for more details. I’m writing the description for the first one in the next day or so.

Happy Valentines Day!

I hope you are doing something fun on Saturday. Current Husband and I are splurging and going to our favorite romantic resturant for dinner.

It’s where our friends took us for dinner after our wedding. We save this place for special evenings, where we hold hands and remember why we like each other so much. I’m really looking forward to it, even if it’s cold and wet, like it’s supposed to be.

Catching up

Posted in MadCap, MadCap software, Personal, Tech Comm, technical writer, technical writing, webinars with tags , , , , , , , , , on February 1, 2009 by Mike

It’s 6:45a on a Sunday morning for me. Current Husband is sleeping, the animals are all asleep, and I’m awake. I’ve been up for an hour and a half, because the old dogs wake me up at 5am to go out. And once I’m awake, I’m up.

In a way, I don’t mind being up so early. I’m home and it’s quiet. I have so little time at home to myself, it’s rather nice.

Other stuff I do

Saturday morning, I taught my first Crochet class at my favorite local yarn store. What does this have to do with Tech Comm you might be asking? Oh, lots.

Friday night, I realized that if I were teaching crochet to people, they needed a thing. So I had to come up with a thing that could be made easily with simple stitches. I could teach the stitches in class and then send them home with the pattern. So I wrote a very simple hat pattern and quickly made a sample to show in class.

In class, I had them start with the simplest stitches and then do those over and over until they were confident. Then we did the next one. And so on, until they had practiced all the stitches they needed to have to make the hat. After 2 hours, I sent them on their way with the pattern.

Coat of many Tech Comm colors

Teaching this crochet class was Tech Comm in action. I identified the:  

  • Audience: Knitters
  • User goal: Learn the basics of crochet
  • Learning attention span: About 2 hours
  • Skills needed for the goal (that fit with the above): 4 stitches
  • Order to teach the stitches: from simplest to more complex, building and reinforcing skills from one stitch to the next
  • Opportunity for reinforcing with self learning: The simple hat pattern

My Tech Comm background was very useful in putting this class together! I had a good time teaching it and several people are now able to crochet. I’ll do another class on Tunisian crochet in March sometime.

It’s fun to get slightly outside my usual life and teach new skills to people. I think that when we stop learning, we spiritually die. It’s why I love our field so much – I learn new stuff every day.

Work, work, work

Work this week was long and busy. We have a new promotion you may want to look at for the month of February. It’s a screaming deal and should help you get noticed if you’re looking for work or think you might be looking for work soon.

We did the second of the webinars this week as well. These are so successful, I’m working with several people and scheduling June and July now. Keep watching our website for more webinars on various Tech Comm topics.

Between the new promotion for Feb and the webinars, your skills should be so up to date, you can’t help but be successful!

The rest of my day

I have a fairly busy day ahead of me. I need to do laundry, meet a former student for lunch, work on the sweater I’m making for my grand daughter, watch Super Bowl and spend time with Current Husband.

Be very good if I could get the oil changed in my car and get it washed, too. That would be a productive day!

Off I go!

Happy Holiday to you from MadCap

Posted in MadCap, MadCap software, Personal, Tech Comm, technical writer, technical writing with tags , , , , on December 19, 2008 by Mike

This is probably my last blog post for 2008. I’m on vacation from the 21st to the 5th. A well deserved vacation, during which I plan to spend time with Current Husband, clean the house of junk, plan the next UC Riverside class, walk the dog a lot, knit, crochet, visit with friends, watch the backlog of DVR-ed TV, and, perhaps, sleep.

But I wanted to make sure I extend to everyone, regardless of the specific holiday you may celebrate, a Happy Holiday from MadCap Software. May your holidays be full of happiness. And may the next year be full of interesting and good things.

Thoughts at the end of the year

I’ve been blogging for 11 months. In that time, this blog has been hit with readers some 9,600 times. As much as I like being the center of attention, it’s a little odd to think there’s potentially 9,600 people who find what I might write worth reading. I’ll keep trying to write useful information or make you laugh or something in the next year.

With the uncertain economic situation worldwide, I urge you to be certain your skills are up-to-date. I preferred to never see another 2002 again, but I think we’re seeing it again. I’m not hearing about large numbers of technical communicators being laid off this time, but still…

With the uncertain economy in mind, MadCap Software is offering free webinars to help you keep your skills up-to-date. I’m talking to several more people about topics this spring. Keep watching this blog and our site at http://www.madcapsoftware.com/demos/webinars.aspx

And remember, if you have a topic you’d like to present, contact me and let’s discuss it.

Why are we doing these webinars? Because it’s scary out there. We can’t fix that but we can help a little. If you’re out of work, these webinars might help you get information that helps you find work. If you’re employed, these webinars might help you be more effective.

After all, without you all, MadCap wouldn’t be a success would we? So, in a way, we owe you a lot. This might help balance that.

Off you go!

OK – go have a lovely holiday, filled with the stuff you like and I’ll see you next year.

I’m certain I’ll be twittering while I’m off, so you can always find out what I’m doing that way!

Start of a new week

Posted in Blaze, Flare, MadCap, Madcap flare, MadCap software, Personal, Tech Comm, technical writing with tags , , , , , , , , on November 30, 2008 by Mike

I hope you had a great Thanksgiving, if you celebrate Thanksgiving. If you are not a celebrant, I still hope Thursday was a good day for you. Current Husband and I had a pleasant time with his family and ate lots of yummy food.

I don’t see my mother-in-law as often as I should, but I think of her. I try to bring her gifts when I do see her. This time, I brought her a crocheted shrug and a crocheted sweater. She seemed to really like them and showed them off to the other female relatives as they arrived.

I crochet in the evenings and on the weekends. It’s a way to force my mind to be quiet and still after a 12+ hour day or a week of 12+ hours days. It’s meditating with a useful result.

A brief tech comm side step

Apparently, the Japanese are crazy about crocheting but were frustrated with the lack of patterns in Japanese. So they came up with a way to show any pattern as a picture.

The most complex pattern can be created as a diagram that shows all the stitches as symbols and how they all go together. You don’t need language to follow the pattern, making the craft available to anyone with the materials. For an example, click here.

Knitting and crocheting are kinesthetic activities, by definition. I’m not a visual learner; I’ve stated that before. But I find the graphic to be very helpful if I’m working on a complex project. I can see how this goes together and what to do next when the words make no sense to me. The best patterns include words and a graphic of the pattern to help “see” what to do if you get lost.

This is a brilliant way to think about the information. How much of the information you are working on could be reduced to a graphic? Are you using graphics as supporting materials for people like me who are not visual learners but would like the visual to help them stay on track when the words make no sense?

If a strongly kinesthetic activity can be reduced to pattern pictures, what can you do to support your users and reduce confusion?

The week ahead

This week I’m planning and scheduling free webinars for January and February. WIth training budgets gone in the economic meltdown, we’re hoping to help by offering tool-independant topics and topics about our products.

I’m thinking about (in no particular order):

Moving to topic-based authoring—the last one had 225 people signed up with 170 attending. Hopefully, there’s still interest out there.

Planning for content reuse—regardless of the tool you use, how do you migrate legacy content? How do you start? What about new content?

Building the business case for topic-based authoring—how to make the case to your boss. How to state the issues in a business way and then show the solution so your boss understands why this is the right move.

What’s new in Flare 4—an overview of new features in Flare 4 that will make your life so much easier.

If you have more ideas for other webinars on topics that interest you, go to my poll at this link.

Virtual is good

If you’re interested in learning more about our products or about tech comm topics (such as the above), I’m always available to do a virtual meeting for STC, AMWA, PMI, QA/Test and other organizations. All you need on your end is an internet-connected computer, speakers, a microphone (so people can ask questions) and a Skype account (or a speaker phone and phone line) and we’re good to go.

This is a great way to get a demo or other topic for your professional group at no real expense and reduce the carbon footprint. I was responsible for finding speakers for 2 STC chapters over about 5 years. It can be really hard to find speakers month after month on topics that interest your members.

Contact me (sburton(at)madcapsoftware.com) and let’s set it up!

Fly away duckings, fly away!

This upcoming week is also the last time we see this crop of baby engineers. The last lecture is Tuesday night and then they go into their finals. I’m never ready to let them go.

We only get 10 weeks with them and we have to let them go, assuming they don’t fail the class. As much as I don’t want to let them go, I also don’t want them to fail, so there we are. Off they go!

We get a whole new crop in January. The U is so happy with what we’re doing with the undergraduate students, they offered us 2 more classes. Starting with this Winter quarter, we’re doing Technical Communication for the Graduate students – a huge honor. Probably starting in Summer 2009, we’re offering User-centered Design, 10 weeks about designing for humans and what that means at every step of the process.

Time to start my day

Time to start my day. I have a pot of soup to make, a house to pick up, lunch with a former student, a dog to take to the U to run off leash, laundry to fold, and other household tasks.

Jet lag

Posted in Blaze, Flare, MadCap, MadCap Blaze, Madcap flare, MadCap software, Personal with tags , , , , , , on November 18, 2008 by Mike

Germany is 9 hours off the US West coast. And I’ve always found it harder to go from Europe to the US. As a result, I’m seriously jet lagged. My brain woke me up at 2am this morning, convinced that it was 8am and I’d overslept.

Oddly, I’m 6 hours off, not the 9 I would expect.

I looked at the clock yesterday, thinking that it had to be mid to late afternoon. It was 10am. This was so disturbing, I found Current Husband and verified. It was the correct time, he said. But it was wrong, according to my normally accurate internal clock.

Sigh.

Lord, I was born a rambling woman

After being on the road for 3 weeks, I’m taking 3 personal days to recover, do laundry, pet the dogs, and see Current Husband. I was hoping to get adjusted to the new time zone, but it isn’t going so well. I did do 6 loads of laundry, tho, with another 4 to go today, so that’s not so bad.

However, I teach tonight and have to stay awake until we’re done so this may help. I have no idea if I will be even slightly coherent. Thank the gods that Bonni co-teaches with me so if I become incoherent, she can step in and say things like: “What Sharon is trying to say is…” while I nod off for a few minutes.

You would think these very bright Engineering students could get right on that Teleporter technology. Talk about an interesting problem to solve. What a group of under-achievers… 🙂

Homecomings

This trip is the longest Current Husband and I have been apart and neither of us liked it much. We recognize that these trips need to happen, that once I’m in Europe, the best thing I can do is maximize that time for the company.

But it was really hard to be apart that long. Thank the technology gods for Skype and Yahoo IM (sharonvburton). It saved us several times. We’re just glad that these very long trips will only happen once or twice a year.

The dogs had given me up for dead, I think. When I came thru the door, Gus looked at me like I was a dream and then leaped, grinning. We spent about 10 minutes on the floor while he sat on me, wiggled, and licked me. At 65lbs, you notice that.

Sara came in the room, stopped, looked (she doesn’t see well anymore), smelled, and then moved as fast as I’ve seen her move in a while. She wagged as tho her butt was going to fall off and licked my face.

Lady wandered in and sat behind me, out of the way of all the excitement so I could reach back and pet her. She gets nervous with all the motion because she can hardly see anything.

All the way, very fun. And no one has gotten too far from me since.

Oh, that’s enough about me. Tell me, what you think about me?

(That’s a Groucho Marx quote from, I believe, Coconuts, if you’re curious. I’m a huge Marx Brothers fan. Hey, I’m jet lagging here…)

If you are at all interested in our DITA solution, I cannot encourage you strongly enough to go to our website and sign up for the beta. We want to build tools that do what you need but we can’t do that without your help.

One of the many things I learned from my Second Husband was that I just completely suck at reading minds. It’s just not something I’m good at. So I don’t know what you want or need, after some basic guesses, which, as it turns out, isn’t enough to keep a marriage together.

We need you to help us develop the tools that do what you need them to do. That requires you participate in the process.

Stay tuned for the beta. I think you’re going to like what we’ve done: https://www.madcapsoftware.com/downloads/ditasignup.aspx

I’ve seen fire and I’ve seen rain

Posted in Blaze, Flare, MadCap, MadCap Blaze, Madcap flare, MadCap software, Personal with tags , , , , , , , , on October 14, 2008 by Mike

OK, I haven’t seen rain lately, except briefly last week in Atlanta between flights. But it’s Fire Season for us in So Cal. We have winds and starting last Sunday, we have fires. The worst is north of LA in the western end of San Fernando Valley. Houses burnt, lots of acreage burnt, evacuations, all the normal stuff. We’re a migratory population.

This could continue for us for another 6 to 8 weeks. We always hope not, but our rains don’t always start in late October, like we’d like them to. Sometimes it’s February before we see rain and that’s just no fun at all. We’d prefer a nice early rainy season with just enough rain to get Green by January but not so much rain that we have Flood.

I’ve seen sunny days that I thought would never end

The PCOC show in Tennesee was very fun. I met lots of people and just generally had a really good time. Chattanooga seems like a great town to be eccentric in. I can’t tell you why, I wanted to just be eccentric. But the conference was a success and I think all left with useful information.

On my way out of town, I was looking forward to going to Lookout Mountain where, they said, you can see 7 states. But the day was cloudy and overcast, so I wound up at the airport and left for Atlanta early instead.

I’ve seen lonely times when I could not find a friend

I spent about 6 hours in the Atlanta airport with Brenda H, who, it turns out, is very fun. She was stranded because Atlanta won’t let you check in to board your flight if it’s less than 45 minutes before your flight leaves.

Brenda got to the counter with 40 minutes and they wouldn’t check her in. So she had to wait 13 hours to see if she could stand by on the next flight to Tucson. She ended up in Denver that night and made it home the next day. I felt really bad for her – normally, this is my traveling karma and she got it this time.

But we ate and chatted and hung out and it was good. Turns out we have about 5 people in common, including 2 of my closest friends.

But I always hoped that I’d see you, baby, one more time again

I got in about 11pm Sunday, just dead. My body had no idea what time it was and so defaulted to bone weariness. I spent about 30 minutes talking to my husband and passed out until 6:30a.

I got caught up a bit and then left for San Diego about 11 hours after I got home. As I was unpacking the suitcase to pack the overnight bag, I felt homeless, a transition with a rag top. David assured me that where ever I am is home for him, which helped.

And we have a date this weekend, which I like muchly. We’re going to see Paula Poundstone at the University of California, Riverside. I’m very pleased and excited. I like her work very much and this should be fun. Maybe David will hold my hand and everything.

Happy Birthday, Son

Posted in Blaze, Flare, Madcap flare, MadCap software, Tech Comm, technical writing with tags , , , , , , , on September 2, 2008 by Mike

A few years ago today, the Saturday of Labor Day weekend, 2 weeks early, about 1:40 in the afternoon, I gave birth to my son.

Matthew Michael turns 30 today. He lives in Tulsa with his wife and 2 children and runs a photography business. If you are in the OK area and need photos, he’s your man. Click the Burton Studios link and see what he does.

If you like his site, he did it himself. He talked to my brother, the web god, and described what he wanted to do.

“Gee,” my brother said. “Most people use PHP for that.”

“OK, then I’ll learn PHP,” Matthew said.

So he did.

Did I mention that he has no formal training as a programmer? Yeah. He checked out a book from the library, looked up code samples on the web, thought about what he wanted the site to do, and started coding.

When he was 5, he started taking stuff apart to see how it works. Phones – *working* phones – were one of his favorite things to take apart for a while. Then it was off to VCRs and other stuff, just because he wanted to know what went on inside.

He rebuilt a car engine a few years ago because it needed to be rebuilt. “It was pretty easy, Mom. It’s obvious how it all goes together.” Apparently, my son “sees” how things must go together and then just does that.

This is the sort of brain this kid has. It was…interesting(!) to parent him. A strong visual, kinesthetic learner.

I’m a very proud mom. He’s the best thing I’ve ever done. Despite all the stupid stuff I did as a parent (and I’m sure he’s got a list), he turned out a good man. I’m delighted to know him.

Happy Birthday, Matthew! I doubt he remembers much of the day he arrived but I do!

In other news…

Another quarter of Fuzzy Ducklings has been set free. Bonni and I sent the Ducklings off last week and graded their finals over the weekend. No one cheated, at least that we could tell, and everyone passed. We had some great students this time and this was overall a good class. This group of Duckling engineers seemed to get the relationship between good documentation – spec, test cases, manuals, and so on – and the quality of the product.

We have 3 weeks between quarters before the next group of Ducklings come quacking in. Be nice to have the break.

By the way – our first group of Duckling engineers graduated last June. You may be working with them at some point. If they seem to value tech comm, you can send the thank you cards to me here at this blog and I’ll pass them along to Bonni.

Going with the X-Edit flow

We have exciting stuff going on at MadCap in the next few weeks. I thought I’d cover a little about the X-Edit family of products, to give you a little heads up about how we’re supporting your workflow.

The X-Edit family is 3 products in one, but it’s easier to think of X-Edit and X-Edit Contribute as 2 different modes.

X-Edit    Full featured word processor that also does everything the other 2 products do. Think of it as everything you could want. Saves to PDF, XPS, imports into Flare or Blaze, all that good stuff. Not a replacement for Blaze or Flare, because you don’t have the sort of topic-based authoring features you have in Flare or Blaze.

X-Edit Contribute    Lighter word processing features. You create a template in Flare or Blaze and then send that template to people who contribute to your projects. They open that template and start creating content with your styles, table formats, variables, if you allowed that, and so on. These files import seamlessly into your Flare or Blaze project. You can also do review topics, just like X-Edit Review.

X-Edit Review    When your Flare or Blaze topic is ready for review, you send it for review from inside Flare or Blaze. Flare or Blaze wraps all the stuff it needs for that topic and sends it to the reviewers you specify. The reviewer opens the topic in free X-Edit Review, makes edits or annotations, as you allowed, and then sends it back to you. You save it to your project, review the changes, and either make the changes to your source files or accept the changed topic into your project.

Common Tech Comm environments

As you know, the environment for Tech Comm people varies. I’ve worked with groups where the tech writers designed and wrote all the content. SMEs reviewed the materials for accuracy but never wrote a word.

But I’ve also been in the other extreme, where I didn’t write a single word – my role was to take the content from all the SMEs and wrap it into a tool to publish it. I was the tool expert, not the domain expert.

The X-Edit family lets you work at either end and in the middle somewhere. It fits your workflow, instead of making your change your workflow to fit our idea of what you should be doing.

OK, I hear you saying, so why can’t my content contributors write in Word and send me those files? I thought Flare and Blaze imported Word files?

Your content contributors can still do that, if that’s how you all want to work. We won’t make them stop if that’s what they’re comfortable with.

The advantage to the X-Edit family is that the content they’re creating is using your templates, your variables (if you want them to), your table styles, your everything, if you want them to have it. This means the content comes is very clean, significantly reducing any cleanup time and effort.

And the interface is pretty straightforward. And because you can specify what project features your SMEs can use, you can keep them from hurting themselves by misusing things like variables, conditions, and so on. They can be smart in their domain and you can be smart in yours. It’s a good match.

Just for fun

Posted in Personal with tags , on August 29, 2008 by Mike

I stole this list from Char at http://helpstuff.com/blog/. I liked it. You’re supposed to bold that which you’ve eaten and line out that which you would not try.

As a side note: I worked with a woman once who was insanely cautious with food. Basically, if she’d not eaten it before, she was too worried to try it. I have the opposite approach to food: I love new foods. It’s one of the many things I like about Current Husband – he also loves trying new foods.

Find out more at http://www.verygoodtaste.co.uk/uncategorised/hundreds-and-hundreds/

My favorites? Bold and in color.

Venison
Nettle tea
Huevos rancheros
Steak tartare
Crocodile
Black pudding
Cheese fondue
Carp
Borscht
Baba ghanoush
Calamari
Pho
PB&J sandwich
Aloo gobi
Hot dog from a street cart
Epoisses
Black truffle
Fruit wine made from something other than grapes
Steamed pork buns
Pistachio ice cream
Heirloom tomatoes
Fresh wild berries
Foie gras
Rice and beans

Brawn, or head cheese
Raw Scotch Bonnet pepper
Dulce de leche
Oysters
Baklava
Bagna cauda
Wasabi peas
Clam chowder in a sourdough bowl
Salted lassi
Sauerkraut
Root beer float
Cognac with a fat cigar
Clotted cream tea
Vodka jelly/Jell-O
Gumbo
Oxtail
Curried goat (looking forward to this one)
Whole insects
Phaal
Goat’s milk
Malt whisky from a bottle worth £60/$120 or more
Fugu
Chicken tikka masala
Eel
Krispy Kreme original glazed doughnut
Sea urchin
Prickly pear
Umeboshi
Abalone
Paneer
McDonald’s Big Mac Meal
  (if 20 years ago counts)
Spaetzle
Dirty gin martini
Beer above 8% ABV
Poutine
Carob chips
S’mores
Sweetbreads
Kaolin
Currywurst
Durian
Frogs’ legs
Beignets, churros, elephant ears or funnel cake
Haggis
Fried plantain
Chitterlings, or andouillette
Gazpacho
Caviar
and blini (but not together)
Louche absinthe
Gjetost, or brunost
Roadkill
Baijiu
Hostess Fruit Pie
Snail
Lapsang souchong
Bellini
Tom yum
Eggs Benedict
Pocky
Tasting menu at a three-Michelin-star restaurant
Kobe beef
Hare
Goulash
Flowers (Do Nastursium count?)
Horse
Criollo chocolate
Spam
Soft shell crab
Rose harissa
Catfish
Mole poblano
Bagel and lox
Lobster Thermidor
Polenta
Jamaican Blue Mountain coffee
Snake